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10. februarie 2014 18:44
by skorpionking
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Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5.1 - Microsoft.NET Framework NuGet Libraries in Visual Studio 2013 or 2012

10. februarie 2014 18:44 by skorpionking | 0 Comentarii

Microsoft intends to deliver .NET Framework versions more frequently to make new features and fixes available sooner. In fact, that’s already started with the .NET Framework 4.5.1. Additionally, Microsoft uses NuGet as a release vehicle to deliver our library features and fixes faster in response to customer feedback.

NuGet is a relatively new package format for the .NET Framework. It provides a standard format for packaging libraries that target one or more .NET profiles and can be consistently consumed by developer tools such as Visual Studio. NuGet.org is the primary NuGet repository and the only one the .NET team uses. Visual Studio comes with an integrated NuGet client for referencing and using NuGet packages in your projects.

Microsoft  has been shipping .NET libraries on NuGet for the past few years. Microsoft  has  found NuGet is a great way to deliver libraries to a large number of developers and to multiple .NET platforms at the same time. Microsoft has improved the NuGet UX in Visual Studio 2013 based on broad feedback, particularly for enterprise scenarios.

Better Discoverability and Official Support The Microsoft and .NET NuGet feed was created to improve the discoverability of Microsoft packages. NuGet.org hosts thousands of packages, which could make it challenging to discover the new .NET packages among all the others. This new curated feed provides you with a scoped view of the official Microsoft and .NET packages on NuGet.org. Microsoft intends to only add packages to this feed that meet the same quality and support requirements as the .NET Framework. Therefore, you can use these packages in all the same places you use .NET APIs. Microsoft has  also created a Web view of this feed on the “Microsoft .NET Framework NuGet Packages” page (http://blogs.msdn.com/b/dotnet/p/nugetpackages.aspx), hosted on the .NET Framework Blog.

The NuGet team helped us enable this experience by updating their client in Visual Studio to include filtering by curated feeds. The next screenshot shows the NuGet client in Visual Studio 2013.

Serviceability Some enterprise customers told Microsoft they were waiting to adopt its NuGet packages until central servicing was offered for these libraries through Microsoft Update. Microsoft has  added this update capability in the .NET Framework 4.5.1, enabling apps to take advantage of the new feature. Microsoft Update will be an additional release vehicle for .NET NuGet libraries in the unlikely case that we need to quickly and broadly update a library for a critical security issue. Even with this new option in place, Microsoft will continue to use NuGet as a primary vehicle for library updates and fixes.

Automatic Resolution of Version Conflicts Apps can reference more than one version of a NuGet package. For desktop and Web apps, you needed to manually resolve version conflicts to ensure that a consistent set of libraries is loaded at run time, which may be challenging and inconvenient. To address that, Visual Studio 2013 automatically configures apps to use the highest referenced version of each library, which solves the issue through a straightforward policy. It also matches the policy already used for Windows Phone and Windows Store apps.

Visual Studio 2013 will automatically generate binding redirects in app.config at build time if version conflicts are found within the app. These binding redirects map each of the versions found for a given library to the highest version found. At run time, your app will use a single version—the highest one referenced—of each library. The main motivation behind this feature was to provide a better experience for consuming NuGet libraries; however, it works for any library. The “How to: Enable and Disable Automatic Binding Redirection” topic in the MSDN Library (http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/2fc472t2(v=vs.110).aspx) provides more details about this feature.

Enjoy programming in the new VS2013 with the Update 1 and .NET Framework 4.5.1! More can be found  here(.NET Team Blog)